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New York Times

Nonfiction: Harper Lee and Her Father, the Real Atticus Finch Joseph Crespino’s “biography” of the virtuous lawyer in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and the real man he was modeled after, brings to life the inconsistencies of the South.
Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Fresh Look at Benedict Arnold’s Treason In “Turncoat,” the independent historian Stephen Brumwell argues that Arnold’s plot to foil the American Revolution was more complicated than it has previously appeared.
Nonfiction: Lots of People Love ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.’ Roxane Gay Isn’t One of Them. Tom Santopietro’s “Why ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Matters” is painstakingly researched, if substantively and structurally flawed, Roxane Gay writes.
By the Book: Samantha Hunt: By the Book The author Samantha Hunt, whose novel “The Seas” will be reissued in July, has started an apocalypse library: “I enjoy all these books. I just hope I’ll never need them to survive.”
Nonfiction: What Would Shakespeare Have Made of Donald Trump? Stephen Greenblatt’s “Tyrant” finds parallels between our political world and that of the Elizabethans — and locates some very familiar characters.
Crime: Bears and Poets: Endangered Prey in This Week’s Crime Column The deep woods and the drawing rooms of London are crime scenes in Marilyn Stasio’s column. Also two villages, one in France and the other in England.
Nonfiction: Deep Inside the Obama White House “The World as It Is,” a memoir by the White House aide Ben Rhodes, recounts some of the toughest decisions Barack Obama made during his presidency.
The Book Review Podcast: The Life of Atticus Finch On this week’s podcast, Joseph Crespino talks about “Atticus Finch: The Biography,” and Philip Dray discusses “The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America.”
Nina Baym, Who Brought Novels by Women to Light, Dies at 82 Professor Baym was a key early figure in feminist literary history and criticism, excavating forgotten works by female writers.
Nonfiction: Falling Crime Rates Are Good — at a Cost. A Writer Sees Both Sides. In “Uneasy Peace,” Patrick Sharkey sees disparities when the homicide rate drops. The country is safer, but some people are now afraid of the police.
Children’s Books: Grandmas and Grandpas Are a Kid’s Natural Allies in These Books Affecting stories by the Fan Brothers, Dan Santat and Minh Le, and more celebrate the bonds between grandparents and grandkids.
Nonfiction: Woodrow Wilson Achieved a Lot. So Why Is He So Scorned? Patricia O’Toole’s “The Moralist” is the latest biography of Wilson, who has inspired fierce arguments ever since his death in 1924.

New York Times Sunday book review

Nonfiction: Harper Lee and Her Father, the Real Atticus Finch Joseph Crespino’s “biography” of the virtuous lawyer in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and the real man he was modeled after, brings to life the inconsistencies of the South.
Nonfiction: Lots of People Love ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.’ Roxane Gay Isn’t One of Them. Tom Santopietro’s “Why ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Matters” is painstakingly researched, if substantively and structurally flawed, Roxane Gay writes.
By the Book: Samantha Hunt: By the Book The author Samantha Hunt, whose novel “The Seas” will be reissued in July, has started an apocalypse library: “I enjoy all these books. I just hope I’ll never need them to survive.”
Fiction: Yes, Tommy Orange’s New Novel Really Is That Good Centuries of subjugation weigh down the men and women of “There There,” his quietly devastating debut.
Crime: Bears and Poets: Endangered Prey in This Week’s Crime Column The deep woods and the drawing rooms of London are crime scenes in Marilyn Stasio’s column. Also two villages, one in France and the other in England.
Otherworldly: Heart-Hammering Science Fiction and Fantasy Thrillers They may be action-packed page turners — but these books also ask readers to consider very real social issues.
Nonfiction: Deep Inside the Obama White House “The World as It Is,” a memoir by the White House aide Ben Rhodes, recounts some of the toughest decisions Barack Obama made during his presidency.
The Book Review Podcast: The Life of Atticus Finch On this week’s podcast, Joseph Crespino talks about “Atticus Finch: The Biography,” and Philip Dray discusses “The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America.”
Editors’ Choice: 9 New Books We Recommend This Week Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
Nonfiction: What Would Shakespeare Have Made of Donald Trump? Stephen Greenblatt’s “Tyrant” finds parallels between our political world and that of the Elizabethans — and locates some very familiar characters.
Fiction: Bill Clinton and James Patterson Have Written a Thriller. It’s Good. The former president and the best-selling novelist have packed “The President Is Missing” with inside-the-Beltway intrigue and secret White House details.
Applied Reading: Harry Potter in Your Pocket A newly released role-playing game and a collection of interactive books give readers fresh places to explore J.K. Rowling’s magical world.
Nonfiction: How We Got to Be So Self-Absorbed: The Long Story In “Selfie,” Will Storr searches for the roots of Western narcissism, a journey that takes him from a Scottish cloister to the Esalen Institute in Big Sur.
Nonfiction: Falling Crime Rates Are Good — at a Cost. A Writer Sees Both Sides. In “Uneasy Peace,” Patrick Sharkey sees disparities when the homicide rate drops. The country is safer, but some people are now afraid of the police.
Children’s Books: Grandmas and Grandpas Are a Kid’s Natural Allies in These Books Affecting stories by the Fan Brothers, Dan Santat and Minh Le, and more celebrate the bonds between grandparents and grandkids.
Nonfiction: Woodrow Wilson Achieved a Lot. So Why Is He So Scorned? Patricia O’Toole’s “The Moralist” is the latest biography of Wilson, who has inspired fierce arguments ever since his death in 1924.
Inside the List: ‘Kitchen Confidential,’ First Published in 2000, Tops the List Again Demand for Anthony Bourdain’s memoir has soared since his death.
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