The Virtual Bookcase for browsing and sharing reviews of books. New to this site? Read the welcome page first.

The Virtual Bookcase Home
Recent reviews
Collected book news
Welcome to this site

The Virtual Bookcase : Shelf Computer

Reference books about computer related subjects (system administration, programming).

Shelf parts : First Previous Next Last


Shop for this book
Amazon.co.uk
Review:
From the title, you might be forgiven for thinking this book was about troubleshooting or data recovery. In a way, you'd be right. The first rule of computer troubleshooting is "Know Thy Computer", and this is about getting that information. Not out of the book, but from utilities. This volume is a compendium of information about utilities. Some of the utilities are given full reviews. For most, contact information and a short description have to suffice. But there are hundreds listed, for such tasks as loading extensions, managing memory, backups, compression, diagnostics, protection, resolving conflicts, file recovery, fonts (of course), and printing. In addition, Brown includes bios on authors, and interviews with a select few... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by Rob Slade)
I want to add my review for this book!
Reviews (1) and details of Macintosh Crash Course

Shop for this book
Amazon.co.uk
Book description
Covers the NEW Windows 95 core exam-Exam #70-64--Implementing and Supporting Windows 95 (Exam 70-63 retired March 98, subject to change)Study test questions and practice taking the exam with the exclusive TestPrep test engine on the CD-ROMApproved by Microsoft as Microsoft Certified Professional study material
I want to add my review for this book!
Reviews (2) and details of MCSE Training Guide: Windows 95 70-64 Exam (Covers Exam #70-064)

Shop for this book
Amazon.co.uk
Review:
MCSE: The Core Exams in a Nutshell scores lots of points through its recognition of key facts about the "core four": there's lots of overlap among the exams. Rather than repeat the same information in multiple sections (or multiple volumes, as is becoming standard), Michael Moncur devotes a section of the book to what's unique in each exam, referring to other sections as needed. Each portion of the book starts with an overview of the exam and a list of the chapters' objectives. The chapters conclude with a list of tasks to perform, a complete sample test, and a sort of condensed statement of key facts, suitable for last-minute cramming. The author touches on all the topics that Microsoft mentions in its various Microsoft Certified Software... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by amazon.com)
I want to add my review for this book!
Reviews (3) and details of MCSE : The Core Exams in a Nutshell

Shop for this book
Amazon.co.uk
Review:
A few years ago, a study got some major press which "proved" that the Mac was easier to use than MS-DOS. What the study actually measured was the number of programs that people said they used. MS-DOS users supposedly averaged four programs each, while Mac users almost doubled that, by using seven. I'm still leery of both the logic and the protocol of the study, but my strongest reaction was that this study must have picked a very atypical user sample. While there are many fine and varied programs for specialty use on the Mac, I find most Macs in general office use have a very standard choice of applications. Which is all by way of saying that Lichty's plan of including Word and Excel in an introductory Mac book is a very reasonable ... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by Rob Slade)
I want to add my review for this book!
Reviews (1) and details of Mac, Work & Excel Desktop Companion: The 3-In-1 Guide to the Hottest Mac Software/Book and Disc

Shop for this book
Amazon.co.uk
Review:
It used to be that if you wanted to learn UNIX you were told to read the source code. Then some books came out that taught users how to work, manage systems, and even program under UNIX. Then they said that if you wanted to learn UNIX *internals* you had to read the source code. That is still possibly true, but this will at least give you a start. Chapters one and two provide some history and UNIX concepts. Chapters three to six detail memory management, process management, input/output, and file management. The coverage is primarily, though not exclusively, based on the AT&T-descended System V release 4 version. Chapter seven looks at streams, eight at interprocess communication, and nine at the "crash" utility. copyright Rober... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by Rob Slade)
I want to add my review for this book!
Reviews (1) and details of The Magic Garden Explained: The Internals of Unix System V Release 4: An Open Systems Design
Shelf parts : First Previous Next Last
Search The Virtual Bookcase

Enter a title word, author name or ISBN.

The shelves in The Virtual Bookcase

Arts and architecture (25)
Biography (24)
Business and Management (120)
Cars and driving (53)
Cartoons (45)
Children's books (180)
Computer (475)
Computer history/fun (113)
Computer networks (382)
Computer programming (215)
Computer security (272)
Cook books (89)
Fantasy (154)
Fiction (446)
Health and body (71)
History (138)
Hobby (37)
Horror (65)
Humorous books (52)
Literature (57)
Operating systems (94)
Outdoor camping (162)
Outdoors (236)
Politics (85)
Privacy (61)
Psychology (55)
Religion (17)
Science (113)
Science Fiction (156)
Self-help books (56)
Technology (14)
Travel guides (308)
War and weapons (29)
World Wide Web (213)
Zen (5)
Other books (89)

The Virtual Bookcase is created and maintained by Koos van den Hout. Contact e-mail webmaster@virtualbookcase.com.
Site credits
Copyright © 2000-2020 Koos van den Hout / The Virtual Bookcase Copyright and privacy statement