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Computer programming, languages, techniques.

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The Object-Oriented Thought Process is a concise and readable primer. Matt Weisfeld's years of programming, teaching, and writing have given him a flair for presenting highly technical topics in a clear and interesting manner. He is able to blend abstract concepts with ingenious examples and clear illustrations to quickly teach powerful OOP techniques. The code examples are written in Java and UML but are designed in such a way that a reader with no previous experience will still understand them. The Object-Oriented Thought Process is a clear and accessible alternative to the often dry and overly dense books available on the market today.
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AppleScript, built into the Macintosh OS, is used by hndreds of companies and countless individuals to automate tasks, control applications, automate Web sites, and more. It's a scripting language that uses natural, English-like syntax -- much easier to code than most scripting languages.Sams Teach Yourself AppleScript in 24 Hours offers a clearly written, well organized introduction to AppleScript. The book starts with running existing scripts, then teaches the reader to write simple scripts to create shortcuts and increase productivity on the Mac OS, then moves on to working with popular Macintosh applications with scripts.
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This guide concentrates on applet programming. It assumes a programming background, but no particular language. The explanations are clear in regard to use and coding. However, the material seems to emphasize production, perhaps, at the expense of understanding. The discussion of object-orientation is alright as far as syntax is concerned, but doesn't really explain the concepts. copyright Robert M. Slade, 1997
(Review by Rob Slade)
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Reviews (1) and details of Active Java: Object-Oriented Programming for the World Wide Web

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"Adventures"? Well, I suppose that bringing down a network through faulty programming is adventurous enough in anyone's book. This work is intended to introduce experienced C-language programmers to networks in a UNIX environment, and, particularly, the TCP/IP system. A book directed at experienced programmers can be expected to have some fairly demanding text. Indeed, in addition to code samples which go on for pages, the content is so dense with function and variable names as to sometimes seem like code, itself. However, a close reading shows that the authors have been careful to thoroughly explain all important concepts as they are introduced. They even go so far as to throw in a bit of humour. Topics covered include basic con... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by Rob Slade)
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Reviews (1) and details of Adventures in Unix Network Applications Programming (Wiley Professional Computing)

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Yup, advanced. No introduction, no tutorials, no pretence. After all the "starter" books that really aren't suitable for the novice, it is nice to see a book that aims at the right level for its audience. It's also nice to see a book that distinguishes itself from the pack. OK, we've all had the basics, now why is my month array off by one (page 13)? Why is my instanceof test *always* failing (page 24)? What can I do about performance? In addition to pointing out optimal styles and common traps, Laffra has extended the Java toolkit (you should pardon the expression) with a visual debugger, a C++ to java translator, and the Little Toolkit (LTK) which is built on top of the Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) and addresses some of the dr... Rest of this review on the detail page
(Review by Rob Slade)
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