The Virtual Bookcase for browsing and sharing reviews of books. New to this site? Read the welcome page first.

The Virtual Bookcase Home
Recent reviews
Collected book news
Welcome to this site
Add your own book

Book details of 'The Mother of All Windows 98 Books'

Cover of The Mother of All Windows 98 Books
TitleThe Mother of All Windows 98 Books
Author(s)Woody Leonhard, Barry Simon, Barry Simone
ISBN0201433125
LanguageEnglish
PublishedOctober 1998
PublisherAddison-Wesley Pub Co
Web links for this book
Search at Bookcrossing.com
Wikipedia booksources
Shop for this book
At Amazon.com
At Amazon.co.uk

Back to shelf Operating systems
Amazon.com info for The Mother of All Windows 98 Books

Score:

Vote for this book

The Virtual Bookcase Reviews of 'The Mother of All Windows 98 Books':

Reviewer amazon.com wrote:
Microsoft Windows has always been complicated, and the latest version of this top-selling consumer operating system ranks as the most bewildering to date. While the upgrade is very powerful, most users don't know what Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) is or how to use adjustable font tracking. Woody Leonhard and Barry Simon--experienced Windows professionals, who write for respected industry magazines--explain these things and more in the thorough and often hilarious The Mother of All Windows 98 Books. This omnibus Windows 98 how-to book documents the entire operating system, explaining everything from how to double-click to how to pull off the coolest hacks by editing the Registry. Along the way, the authors give advice on installing Windows 98 properly, getting DOS applications to work right, tweaking multimedia, and much more. Like any good how-to book, this one doesn't take itself too seriously. Its fact-dense pages feature comic relief in the form of cartoon characters--including a caricature of Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates--spouting geek wit. The Mother of All Windows 98 Books is a pleasure to read and extraordinarily informative to boot.
Reviewer Rob Slade wrote:
MOM's books are not necessarily for beginners. Not that they are demanding, or hard to read, but the sheer volume of data can be daunting for those coming to the computer for the first time. Chapter one is, as usual, a "fast track" introduction to Win98 for Win95 users. However, it is far from the usual in terms of content. Leonhard and Simon have actually looked at the system in action, and at what is usable and what is not. USB doesn't get mentioned at all, dual monitors get some solid research into what will work and what won't, but a lot of space is given to a number of useful utilities that most W98 books don't mention at all. There is also a nicely balanced opinion piece on the monopoly and antitrust situation. The concepts and basics are covered in chapter two; and covered, and covered. Moving beyond the normal buttons and bars, it also looks at keyboard shortcuts, directory structures (and important directories, graphics, fonts, sound, and networking. Since this would be the beginner's introduction, it could be a bit overwhelming, but the content is certainly there. (Missed one though, guys. Explorer's behaviour is radically different in *any* directory called "fonts.") Chapter three starts with different ways to invoke programs, but most of it concentrates on various configurations and settings. Utilities, mostly to do with the Internet, are in chapter four. A grab bag of utilities not included with W98 are briefly reviewed in chapter five. Chapter six deals with installation, but it gives you the real gen, not just the dialogue boxes you'll see if nothing goes wrong. Things start to get more technical in chapter seven, looking at a whole raft of configuration files that rarely see the light of day, but can do some interesting things. Chapter eight reviews the myriad settings that can be changed under the Control Panel. The Registry gets a good airing in chapter nine. The MOM series has had a very good record for solid and reliable information not readily available elsewhere. However, with this book I think Leonhard and Simon have gone the extra mile, and, for my money, this is the best thing they've done in the Windows family. Easily the best book so far on Windows 98. If you have Win98 you will not regret buying this reference. copyright Robert M. Slade, 1998
Add my review for The Mother of All Windows 98 Books
Search The Virtual Bookcase

Enter a title word, author name or ISBN.

The shelves in The Virtual Bookcase

Arts and architecture (25)
Biography (24)
Business and Management (120)
Cars and driving (53)
Cartoons (45)
Children's books (180)
Computer (475)
Computer history/fun (113)
Computer networks (382)
Computer programming (215)
Computer security (272)
Cook books (89)
Fantasy (154)
Fiction (446)
Health and body (71)
History (138)
Hobby (37)
Horror (65)
Humorous books (52)
Literature (57)
Operating systems (94)
Outdoor camping (162)
Outdoors (236)
Politics (85)
Privacy (61)
Psychology (55)
Religion (17)
Science (113)
Science Fiction (156)
Self-help books (56)
Technology (14)
Travel guides (308)
War and weapons (29)
World Wide Web (213)
Zen (5)
Other books (89)

The Virtual Bookcase is created and maintained by Koos van den Hout. Contact e-mail webmaster@virtualbookcase.com.
Site credits
Copyright © 2000-2017 Koos van den Hout / The Virtual Bookcase Copyright and privacy statement